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Trophy Wife Is An Alternative Career

Vivia Chen

July 15, 2013

Rupert_Murdoch_Wendi_Murdoch_2011_Shankbone(1)It's steamy and stinky in New York, and I am feeling punchy. For a long time now, I've been your faithful career sherpa, dutifully telling you about the hottest practice areas, best firms for women's advancement, and other good stuff to help you succeed.

Well, folks—especially you, ladies—I'm about to step off the reservation. Though I usually tell women to go for the brass ring at work, brace yourself for a different type of advice.

If you're sick and tired of slaving away at a law firm (which I totally get), there is an obvious alternative career we haven't explored: trophy wife. If you've got the goods (nice body, tall—the face is secondary), why not trade in that quick ticket to a spectacular lifestyle?

Oh, I know some of you are shocked and disgusted at my suggestion. Chillax. It's summer. Let's be free and imaginative.

Why am I proposing that you ladies (though this could also pertain to men) consider this well-trodden career path? Well, Tina Brown, the ever-clever editor of The Daily Beast, has an amusing piece on what fifthy rich men look for in trophy wives these days. The news flash: Buxom bimbo babes are out! The newest crop of trophy wives, writes Brown, are accomplished women in their thirties or forties who have (or had) serious careers. In fact, some "trophies" are even a bit older—though it's critical that you are at least 25 years younger than your sugar daddy.

Still not convinced that this is the trend? Brown gives us some helpful, real-life examples:

What’s interesting about the new crop of billionaire-geezer engagements is that formerly termed “cupcakes” are out of style. Wendi Murdoch [recently estranged wife of Rupert] . . . was the harbinger of this billionaire dating trend. She has an MBA (from the Yale School of Management), and so does the next Mrs. [George] Soros, who started an Internet dietary-supplement-and-vitamin-sales company and now has developed a “Web-based yoga platform.” Leonard Lauder’s charming fiancée likewise is a businesswoman of substance [she's CEO of the Brooklyn Public Library].

Brown exclaims: "What an encouraging trend!" She adds that it could lead to "a new marital theory of Sex and Substance Overload."

Encouraging indeed—especially for all you superachievers out there who have aced your way through a highly selective college and law school and are now working unhappily at some prestigious law firm. Unlike years past, Trophywifedom is now within your reach! So rev your engines, show a little cleavage, and start chatting it up with that big honcho on the management or compensation committee. Better yet, go for the client—that balding partner at Goldman Sachs or Blackstone, or that scary octogenarian tycoon waiting in the conference room. (In case you need reminding, Rupert is now available.)

Isn't it nice to know that all that hard-earned education will finally get you a decent job?

Related post: The Rich Husband.

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Do you have topics you'd like to discuss or tips to share? E-mail The Careerist's chief blogger, Vivia Chen, at VChen@alm.com.

Comments

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Ditto! Love this item. (Thanks for the laughs; just got back from vacation, where my kids and stay-at-home husband remain).

I didn't go to Yale and am only 5 feet tall. Maybe I can aspire to be an Honorable Mention wife.

I have always felt that the young bimbo wives were a liability. With 50 being the new 40, I wholeheartedly endorse the mature trophy wife. Besides, we know what to do with money other than buy clothes and "It" bags. Hello, real estate and venture capital investments!

The age difference won't be that spectacular, but don't forget Nandana Sen (Broadway/Film actress, the self-proclaimed intellectual, and daughter of Nobel Prize winner Amartya Sen), who recently married Penguin CEO Joh Makinson. Then there was Padma Laxmi, who married Salman Rushdie, and found the marriage a little too stifling...I think they are divorced now.

Hahaha. Love this break-from-routine blog. Definitely caught me off guard. Love the sarcasm with comes with an unfortunate reality.

Great piece. I know friends who fit in this category. It's takes the "MRS Degree" concept to a new level!

Hysterical! I love your blog; it gives me a smile every day. Keep up the good work.

Thanks for the laugh! Nice to know I'll never be in that group!

I am outraged by this article! Being short (5'3), I do not qualify. Where is height parity?

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About The Careerist

The Careerist takes an inside look at how lawyers shape their careers and manage their lives. The blog aims to dissect developments in the profession, provide useful information and advice, and give lawyers a platform to voice their views. The goal is to provide a fresh, provocative take on the state of lawyering.

About Vivia Chen

Vivia Chen

Vivia Chen, The Careerist's chief blogger, has been covering the business and culture of law firms for a decade. A former corporate lawyer, Chen is fascinated by those who thrive (as well as those who don't) in the legal profession. Her take: Success in the law (and life) doesn't always travel a linear path. If you have topics you'd like to discuss or information to share, contact her: VChen@alm.com

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